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Kantara Project in Oberlin HS

Fadma and Majda, Photo by Anna Beeke


by Rachel Mentzer, Oberlin High School

As part of the Kantara Project, several Oberlin high school classes have taken on curriculum that relates to Morocco and the Untangling Threads show. This Advanced Art High School class led by Danielle Camino has produced beautiful pieces of mixed media artwork that is a response to Anna Beeke’s photography of Moroccan artisans that are part of weaving cooperatives in the Middle Atlas mountains that Kantara works with.

Breaking Bread with Moroccan Artisans


All of the weavers from this cooperative in the Middle Atlas of Morocco gather in the home of an artisan who has just given birth to a healthy baby boy. The mother and her newborn rest in the next room while the rest of the women share an afternoon snack of Moroccan mint tea, recently-pressed olive oil and freshly baked bread.

This photograph by Anna Beeke is part of Untangling Threads: Women Artisans in Morocco’s Rug Weaving Industry, a traveling exhibit that displays the documentary photographs of the life and lifestyle of women artisans beside handwoven Moroccan rugs woven by the same women. This exhibit has been shown in a wide variety of places, from New York galleries, college libraries, high schools, and street fairs and offers the viewer a glimpse into rural Moroccan life as it documents the life, culture, and craft of female weavers, while specifically focusing on artisans from rural weaving communities in the Middle and High Atlas mountains.

Moroccan Family Portrait


A glance into rural Moroccan family life.

This photograph by Anna Beeke is part of Untangling Threads: Women Artisans in Morocco’s Rug Weaving Industry, a traveling exhibit that displays the documentary photographs of the life and lifestyle of women artisans beside handwoven Moroccan rugs woven by the same women. This exhibit has been shown in a wide variety of places, from New York galleries, college libraries, high schools, and street fairs and offers the viewer a glimpse into rural Moroccan life as it documents the life, culture, and craft of female weavers, while specifically focusing on artisans from rural weaving communities in the Middle and High Atlas mountains.

Family Life in Morocco


Jamila and her son Adam pose inside their Taznakht home, which is also the headquarters of a weaving cooperative. Jamila spends most of her day in this room, or in the workshop around the corner.

This photograph, by Anna Beekeis part of the traveling art exhibit, Untangling Threads: Women Artisans in Morocco’s Rug Weaving Industry. This exhibit displays documentary photographs of the life and lifestyle of women artisans beside their very own handwoven, Moroccan rugs. This exhibit has been shown in a wide variety of places, from New York galleries, college libraries, high schools, and street fairs and offers the viewer a glimpse into rural Moroccan life as it documents the life, culture, and craft of female weavers, while specifically focusing on artisans from rural weaving communities in the Middle and High Atlas mountains.